Brow Henna: Trend or Flop?

October 31, 2017

It’s hard to keep up with the latest brow fashions let alone trends. In the fast-growing industry of brow augmentation, women are always subjecting themselves to the craziest trends to get the perfect brows they desire. From men’s beard dye to black henna, brow stamps to the extreme self-microblading; we’ve seen many trends come and go. Which begs the question: Is brow henna the next big thing?

Firstly, let’s set the record straight: There’s an ongoing debate that “only henna is true henna” and anything not based on the original henna is dangerous. This is simply not true. Although the word henna comes from the original powdered henna plant leaf which started it all, now it is synonymous with the concept of plant-based powder dyes. And many other plants besides henna have been proven safe and effective. The truth is many poor (often toxic) products have emerged trying to make a quick buck on the “henna hype-train”. Bad products hurt consumers and have limited the application and growth of plant-based dyes. Users have every right to be skeptical and careful about the latest “henna” products and trends.

Brow Henna is not that. Brow Henna is 99% natural and organic. There are so many colors to choose from now and they can be blended to color match your skin tone or desired hair color. Brow henna’s are plant based, and stain the skin and hair just as long as that orangey red henna. Actually, the lighter blonde hennas really don’t last as long as other colors, but we are looking at 2 to 4 weeks stain on the skin, and 6 weeks tinted hair. That’s phenomenal retention.

BH Brow Henna started in Russia. Russian’s are the leaders in beauty and cosmetology. I follow about 200 Russian beauticians on Instagram and Brow Henna has been advancing and it’s not hard to understand why. It’s basically a powder ombre look all day and night for weeks. It’s very similar to the looks achieved with permanent makeup without the downtime and fuss with how your skin will heal and take to pigment. It fades naturally with cell turn over, so you can change your look every time you come in.

It takes about 25 minutes after the first layer of henna is applied to complete the process. There will be about three layers painted on to achieve the perfect pigment density. The appointment is about 30 minutes which is half the time of a lash extension fill and half the price. It’s so worth saving 10 to 20 minutes every morning trying to frame your face with multiple brow pencils, cakes, powders and spoolies that are never there when you need them.

When brow henna doesn’t work is with skin that is damaged, too oily, or over scarring. Keep that in mind because powder fill permanent makeup might be the best option for oily skin, and strokes and/or powder fill permanent makeup works pretty well for scarring.

The best way to find out if Brow Henna is right for you is to book an appointment already... But wait, no one is doing it in your area? Share this post! I can’t be the only one jumping on this Russian band wagon!

-Stacy